Thursday, February 4, 2010

FOOD, FOOD, FOOD and will you just go to bed!

For some of you out there that do not know I have 6 children. What, no I'm crazy..... a least I don't think that I am?? Anywho.....

I have a 12 year old, 8 year old, 5 year old, 4 year old (the T1), 2 year old and an 18 month old,

did I forget everyone??

You can only imagine my house is a mad house, I have kids running all over the place all the time, I have one fight popping up after another (between the kids...of course), I have kids wanting to do this and others wanting to do that, I have mommy this and mommy that, mommy watch me and mommy get that, I have kids constantly wanting something to drink and of course these kids are always asking for food, snacks, when are we going to eat, I am hungry, mom can I just have one, PLLEEEAAAAASSE. FOOD, FOOD, FOOD, FOOD, FOOD!

The way that we have been trained and do Cara's insulin is she has breakfast and a shot of insulin, snack, lunch and a shot of insulin, snack, dinner and a shot of insulin, bed time snack and a shot of long acting insulin.

Very straight forward and easy you would think.

Until you throw 5 other hungry and sometimes starving kids into the mix. They all seem to want to have snacks at very different times and the second you tell one that they can have a snack you have a crowd of screaming kids ALL asking for their snack and this includes Cara.

We have tried to solve this issue with having large amount of "free" foods for Cara that matches what the other kids want to eat. So we will buy two different types of yogurts, regular and "sugar free" or "fat free" . "Free" foods for Cara are basically any foods that are sugar free and/ or have 5 carbs or under. So if the kids ask for a snack at any time that Cara is not scheduled to have a snack I will have the kids eat "their" yogurt and Cara can have her "free" yogurt. But this does not always work out.

We also tried having scheduled snack times for all the kids that matched up with Cara's schedule snack but that always ends up in a fight or a whole lot of tears.

The worst issue that we are having is food that is being left out on counters or tables that Cara knows she can not have but will still sneak it.....of course she is only 4. When the kids pull something out of the cabinets the food never finds its way back where it came from. Before you know it the whole bag of chips are gone and Cara was the one eating them. Sometimes Cara is just a little sneaker and she will sneak off into another room to enjoy a wonderful snack that will cause her blood sugar to sky rocket and cause countless hours of me trying to figure out "what went wrong"? When all along it was the 2year old Christmas chocolate that Kailyn was saving in her room, for God knows what reason?.....but yes Cara decided that she was going to eat it and I spent all day and half the night trying to figure out "what went wrong". Finally when Kailyn went to bed the mystery was solved when see noticed her beloved chocolate kitten's body was half eaten.

What is a mother to do??

On another note since Cara's dx almost one year ago she has had issues with sleeping. It takes her forever to fall asleep. Her bedtime is 8:00-8:30, depending on how long I can put up with her (JOKE) but not really. And she will stay up until 10:30-11:00, it's like her body just can't slow down enough for her to sleep. Does anyone else have this issue??

11 comments:

AjsMommy82 said...

We had "issues" with set meal/snack times too! If she had lunch at noon she couldn't have snack and a shot until 3 which pushed back dinner to 6 which didn't leave much time for baths and bedtime at 7, so I chose to let her have the snack and just add the correction to her dinner that way we could eat at 5 like we used to. When we saw her endo last time I told him this because he was wondering why she was high every night at dinner, he said I could continue to do that or I could give her the shots less than 3 hours apart as long as I didn't correct her before the 3 hours were up. So some days I just correct and some days I give her the shot. Not sure how your endo feels about that but it wouldn't hurt to ask. This is one of the reasons I'm excited about starting the pump! :)
Now for the sleep! Alivia was the same way! I had to cut out the naps at 18 months and started putting her to bed at 7pm and she sleeps until 7am!

Hallie said...

We were not on the same kind of insuling therapy as you, before the pump, so I can't be of much help. Avery got a shot after each and every meal or snack. 6 plus shots a day....

We DO have sleeping issues. Before dx, she went to bed - on her own - each and every night and slept like a champ. Now... we MUSt stay with her until she falls asleep. She has nightmares. She's up FOREVER. She just went to bed and 11pm. Not that she hasnt been in bed since 8:30. But she's hovering at 80.... And she does NOT nap during the day. I don't know. I'm at a loss. No helpful hints - just, Yeah, I'm there too. :)

Laura Houston said...

I don't have any advice for you but do want to say . . . WOW!! You are such an amazing mommy! I forget - are you guys looking at the pump yet?

Best of luck - awesome rock star mom!

Amy said...

Oh I so hear you on the food stuff!! I am CONSTANTLY getting after my older kids for leaving things out where Jada can reach them! Just about any time she's snuck something...it's because that something has been left in her reach. What's not tempting to a 4 year old when it comes to candy??? ugh. It's tough...on everyone!

Jada was doing great with sleeping before diagnosis! I think this disease is just so disruptive to what should be a "normal" routine. NONE of my kids had a problem with settling down and going right to sleep...and she didn't either until diabetes. I hate it...because she NEEDS that rest and Jeff and I NEED that time! She's always the last one to fall asleep...but is often the last one out of bed, too. Ugh.

Meri said...

Oh my gosh! I can just see her hiding eating (relishing) that chocolate rabbit!! I know it isn't easy...I guess that is one benefit of having 3 t1's...they know when they can eat, and if someone gets an extra snack because of a low, there isn't complaining...they "get it."

We don't have big sleeping problems, sometimes L can't get to sleep...so he sits in bed, bored for hours. B used to wake up with leg pains, but it passed just like every phase.
The sleeping thing will pass...hang in there friend!

Nicole said...

thanks everyone, well at least I don't feel like it is some thing that we are doing to cause the sleeping problems now :)

Laura~ we will be looking into pumps soon I think. Our clinic makes everyone wait one year before they are even able to talk about getting the pump and her A1C needs to be in a certain range as well. So ya some day?!

Reyna said...

I so hear you on the SNACK thing...I only have two kids, but have kids over here all the time...and really try to keep the food "fair" in our home...I wrote about it a little in my Blog under "friends"...titled "Adie (like the #80)"...fortunately, Joe doesn't seem to mind when others snack without him...he is now 6 years old...he was diagnosed @ 3...my blog is betabuddies.blogspot.com. Best of luck..and great blog BTW!

Rachel said...

When Tristan was on shot, he had an injection every single time that he ate.... anything! The pump has helped a lot with that. It does give us a lot more freedom. We also had to wait before his doctor in FL would allow us to discuss the pump. He wanted us very comfortable with injections in case something went wrong with the pump and we had to go to injections for a few day.

First time we tried the pump, Tristan was a little over 2 years old... it didn't go over too well :( We tried it again when he was a few day over 4 years old. This time it took :)

We have always told Tristan that it was very important that he not eat anything without telling us. We told him how it would mess with his blood sugar and make him feel bad. When he started school, we also explained how very important it was that he not share food with anybody because everything was measured/weight and we knew what the carbs were. I'm always amazed at how much he understands. Have you tried sitting with her and explaining how sneaking food is really bad for her and why? Maybe you can talk to your doctor about changing her injection routine to give you a little more flexibility?

Wow! I'm writing a book here... sorry :)

:) Tracie said...

Sometimes it's hard with Jessi because she goes through growing spurts and that causes her to eat like an animal.
Lately she seems to be going throught his stage of wanting to be "normal". We had this heartbreaking discussion after the special night out with dad about her sneaking lemonade. For the most part she doesn't sneak food, but she has.
She seems to always be the hungriest right before it's time for bed. What's with that? I can't remember any sleep issues before Dx, but she was only 19 months at the time. She goes to bed late, but that's a schedule issue.

I don't know how you do it! But kudos to you!

stacy said...

Couldnt you just change all the foods for all the children to sugar free?

Nicole said...

Hello Stacy,
No we cant change all the foods to sugar free because first of all these are kids and they need to have well balanced meals and snacks. For example apples have natural sugars, and Cara like other children NEED sugar in their diet. We count carbohydrates (a form of sugar) our kids need this to grow and function however because their pancreas no longer produce insulin because they are suffering from an autoimmune disease we ( the parents, in our case) need to give Cara a certain amount of insulin for the certain amount of carbohydrates that she eats. So her body is able to use the sugar and the bodies cells gets the fuel that it needs to survive. Without it our children would die. But sometimes sugar free is good, we use sugar free drinks mostly.

And really I don't think that food with artificially sugars are all the healthy either!

I hope that makes sense to you?? It is very complicated and very involved so when trying to explain it simply I may miss some important details.